7 Types Of Fuchsia Plants - Urban Agriculture

7 Types Of Fuchsia Plants

7 Types of Fuchsia Plants

Known for their beautiful blooms and rich, vivid colors, fuchsia are amongst the most spectacular and popular summer garden flowers.

However with over 100 different species and thousands of different cultivated varieties, it can be difficult to choose which fuchsia plants are the best. 

Although they typically bloom during the spring, summer, and early fall, there are a few hardy species that can bloom until the first frosts of winter.

As fuchsias are perennial, they require very little care and have various growing habits. From trailing or cascading to bushy and upright, fuchsias are typically used for hanging baskets and window baskets.

However, they’re also used frequently in summer beddings. As fuschias aren’t fragile flowers, some species are able to withstand temperatures of -10 °F.

Although the winter temperatures will remove their leaves, fuchsias are unlikely to die completely from the drop in temperatures, so when spring arrives they will bloom again. 

As well as they’re “easy to care for” growing habits, fuchsias are typically chosen because of their beautiful blooms.

Their bright colors brighten up any space, and they typically produce luscious pink or purple flowers, and fiery reds blossoms, but they can also bloom in white or peach colors for a softer look.

Their bright colors often attract butterflies and their sweet nectar is irresistible to hummingbirds, which is perfect if you’re looking to attract more wildlife to your garden. 

With such a wide variation of fuchsia species available, it can be difficult to find your favorite. However, we’ve put together a list of some of the best, hardiest, and most beautiful fuchsia plants that we could find.

7 Types of Fuchsia Plants

‘Dollar Princess’ Fuchsia

This variety of fuchsia blooms well in both sun and shade, and produces red and purple petals that give them an exotic appearance.

The shrub produces woody branches where new tender growth emerges each spring. It is also one of the few double fuchsias that can survive winter temperatures, which is why it is favored by gardeners in almost every climate. 

To increase the chances of your Dollar Princess surviving in colder climates, it’s important that you remove all dead foliage, and pile mulch or leaves around the base of the plant to protect the roots.

As wet winter soils can cause root rot, fuchsias that are kept in raised beds have a much higher chance of survival. 

Overall Dollar Princess is a beautiful fuchsia, and it’s boldly bright petals will brighten up any garden space. 

Native Area:

Central America and South America

Sun Exposure:

Thrives in both full sun and partial shade 

Height Average:

1 – 2 feet 

United States Department Of Agriculture (USDA) Growing Zones:

6 – 11

7 Types of Fuchsia Plants

‘Seventh Heaven’ Fuchsia 

This fuchsia produces double-blossom flowers which closely resemble angel’s wings. It’s flowers are usually white, but they have a pink under-blossom.

In recent years, ‘Seventh Heaven’ has attracted a new following as it’s a giant hybrid that has all of the beauty that classic dainty fuchsias have, just on a much larger scale.

Unlike most plants that produce large flowers, like sunflowers, ‘Seventh Heaven’ isn’t stingy when it comes to the number of blooms that it produces. 

‘Seventh Heaven’ can trail up to 18 inches in window boxes, and typically produce four-inch blooms. For a greater impact, try planting this fuchsia with other hybrid fuchsias like ‘Voodoo’ or ‘Quasar’.

Native Area:

Nursery hybrid who’s parent species is native to South America 

Sun Exposure:

Thrives in both full sun and partial shade

Height Average:

2 – 3 feet 

United States Department Of Agriculture (USDA) Growing Zones:

8 – 11

7 Types of Fuchsia Plants

‘Lady In Black’ Fuchsia 

Most gardeners opt for fuchsias as they rely on their trailing habit to spill out of hanging baskets or window boxes. However, ‘Lady in Black’ has a climbing habit, which is often rare in the world of fuchsias.

These fuchsias can climb up to 6 feet in one growing season, and can produce hundreds of flowers in just one blooming season.

For this fuchsia to climb, it needs something to attach itself to, so make sure you give it a trellis or a fence lined with thin mesh to help it climb. 

‘Lady in Black’ also has a unique appearance. The coral colored petals are offset with a deep, plum colored under-blossom, hence where the fuchsia’s name derives from. 

Native Area:

Central America and South America 

Sun Exposure:

Thrives in both full sun and partial shade 

Height Average:

6 feet (needs a trellis or wire to aid climbing)

United States Department Of Agriculture (USDA) Growing Zones:

8 – 11

7 Types of Fuchsia Plants

‘Swingtime’ Fuchsia 

‘Swingtime’ is another exotic hybrid that is perfect for placing in hanging baskets. These fuchsias produce beautiful white petals, which is a bright pop of color against the dark red sub-petal.

When in bloom, this hanging fuschia produces flowers up and down it’s stem, but the most enchanting are the larger flowers that typically bloom at the bottom of the stem.

Despite heavier flowering occurring at the end of the stems, this fuchsia has a dense floral look as flowers bloom all over the plant. 

‘Swingtime’ typically blossoms from June until October, and grows best in both full sun or partial shade. However, it’s best to bring the plant inside in winter and back outside again in mid-spring. 

Native Area:

Central America and South America 

Sun Exposure:

Thrives in both full sun and partial shade 

Height Average:

2 – 3 feet 

United States Department Of Agriculture (USDA) Growing Zones:

8 – 11

7 Types of Fuchsia Plants

Hardy Fuchsia 

This is an award-winning shrub that produces dainty, elegant blossoms in deep pink and purple shades. It typically blooms from summer until the first winter frosts, and can grow up to 2 – 3 feet in height in both full sun or partial shade.

Even the foliage on this fuchsia is as beautiful as the flowers, as the vibrant green will brighten up any garden space. 

Hardy Fuchsia is best used near border walls, and looks stunning in both coastal and cottage gardens. To keep the plant healthy and strong, you should cut back any stems from last year’s bloom.

As a hardy flower, this fuschia can grow well in sandy soil, or even soil that contains a large amount of clay. 

Native Area:

South America 

Sun Exposure:

Thrives in both full sun and partial shade 

Height Average:

4 – 10 feet 

United States Department Of Agriculture (USDA) Growing Zones:

6 – 9 

7 Types of Fuchsia Plants

Bolivian Fuchsia 

Though more and more fuchsia hybrids are created each year, sometimes the most simplistic of a species can be the most beautiful, and that’s nowhere more true than with the Bolivian fuchsia.

This fuchsia is a fast-growing plant which blooms from June to September, and each year you can guarantee that it’s bloom will produce the same results.

The delicate flowers appear in clusters of pink and purple petals that often attract hummingbirds to feed on their nectar. The plant can even produce edible fruit, however, it’s more of a novelty than an actual side dish. 

Out of all the garden fuschias, the shrub of the Bolivian fuchsias is one of the largest, and works best as either a summer bedding, or when it’s grown in a large container.

The only downside to Bolivian fuchsia is that it doesn’t do well in cold, wintry temperatures, and can only survive a brief exposure to temperatures at a minimum of 25 °F. 

Native Area:

Bolivia, Peru, and Northern Argentina

Sun Exposure:

Thrives in both full sun and partial shade 

Height Average:

8 – 13 feet 

United States Department Of Agriculture (USDA) Growing Zones:

9 – 11

7 Types of Fuchsia Plants
This is a plant portrait of Fuchsia magellanica var. gracilis ‘Aurea’.

‘Aurea’ Fuchsia 

This fuchsia differs greatly from other fuchsia plants as it has a beautifully delicate golden foliage which is contrasted by the fiery red flowers.

Although the lack of flowers may seem like an issue, the foliage really holds the spotlight with this fuchsia. It also looks great when the bright golden leaves are paired with flowers on the opposite end of the color spectrum, such as red snapdragons or purple pansies. 

‘Aurea’ is also different to other hybrid species due to the fact that it is a shrubbery species, rather than a container species.

However, it can also be overwintered indoors in areas where the winter climate is too cold. Like Hardy fuchsia, this plant can grow well in sandy or clay soil, as long as the soil is kept moist. 

Native Area:

South America

Sun Exposure:

Thrives in both full sun or partial shade

Height:

2 – 4 feet 

United Stated Department Of Agriculture (USDA) Growing Zones:

Growing Zones: 7 – 9 

Frequently Asked Questions

How Big Do Hardy Fuchsias Grow? 

Most hardy fuchsias grow an average of four to ten feet in height, and around three to six feet in width. They mostly bloom in spring and summer, but can sometimes persist during fall and early winter climates, depending on the species. 

Do Fuchsias Grow Back? 

Fuchsias are perennials, which means that they live for several years (if cared for properly). This means that if grown outside in a warm climate, they will come back year on year.

However, if you live in a colder climate, most gardeners recommend overwintering your fuchsia indoors to prevent it from dying in the frosty conditions. 

Can Fuchsias Be Planted In The Ground? 

Fuchsias can indeed be planted in the ground, as many fuchsias grow to be over ten foot tall. Some, like the ‘Lady in Black’ fuchsia, even like to climb.

However, in colder climates fuchsia needs to be brought inside during the winter months, so for that reason it is easier to keep your fuchsia in pots or large containers. 

Final Thoughts 

So there you have it, seven of the best fuchsia plants that will brighten up any garden space.

Just remember to choose a fuchsia that can withstand the cold or hot climates of your region, or put in place a plan to bring your fuchsia inside during bitter frost and overwhelming heat, and your fuchsia will live for years to come.

Caroline Roberts
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